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Uke-ifying my favourite songs


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Up Above My Head, I Hear Music In The Air – Sister Rosetta Tharpe / Rhiannon Giddens

We’re digging back in time a bit with this one. Back to the days before rock and roll. In fact back to one of the more unlikely precursors of rock and roll.

<songsheet in C> <songsheet in G>

Sister Rosetta Tharpe is not a name that often appears in the pantheon of the most influential 20th century musicians, but the unique sound and guitar playing that she pioneered in the 1930s and 1940s paved the way for the rock and roll greats of the 1950s and beyond (Strange Things Happening Every Day is a particularly good example). Mixing spiritual lyrics with a gritty and rhythmic accompaniment, and performing in nightclubs and concert halls, Tharpe upset many in the religious communities of the time, but achieved real cross-over success, particularly in the 40s when she had a number of top 10 singles in the US.

Up Above My Head is a Tharpe original that uses the traditional call-and-response form of Gospel songs, with short, simple lines, and a number of thematic variations for the verses. Set against a rhythmic background of bass and piano, with Tharpe’s guitar playing (and soloing) over the top, the song was a big hit in the US in 1948, and has been covered many times since, including by Elvis Presley in a TV special, and most lately (and fabulously, if I do say so) by the hugely talented Rhiannon Giddens.

 

And so to the song sheet. There are so many different versions of the song, even by Sister Rosetta Tharpe, that it’s hard to know where to begin. So I’ve based the verses on the Rhiannon Giddens version, but created two versions in different keys, one in C, the other in G (the Giddens version is in F!). It’s pretty straight-forward, the only one note of reference is to say that the C7/G7 chord on the third line of each verse comes right before the second half of the line (e.g. “I hear music in the air”) rather than right after the first half of the line (i.e. “Up above my head”). Also, I haven’t put the responses in the lyrics as it rather crowded and complicated the sheet – but feel free (in fact I encourage you!) to put them in. Enjoy!

<songsheet in C> <songsheet in G>

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Don’t Let It Trouble Your Mind – Dolly Parton / Rhiannon Giddens

giddens-tomorrow-is-my-turnI only came across Rhiannon Giddens about a month ago, following one of those “customers who brought x also brought y” trails on Amazon. And she was something of a revelation. Rhiannon is better know – if she is known at all – as singer, violinist and banjo player in old-time American music revivalists Carolina Chocolate Drops (and isn’t the world a better place knowing there is a band called Carolina Chocolate Drops in it!). Classically trained (she studied opera), she has just released her debut solo album, Tomorrow Is My Turn, which acts as a show-case for a hugely versatile talent, mixing country, gospel, jazz, blues, chanson and more.

<songsheet>

One of those is this Dolly Parton song. The opener from Dolly’s 1969 album, In the Good Old Days (When Times Were Bad),¬† this was recorded during the time she was partnering with Porter Wagoner, and before she had really established herself as a solo artist. One thing it does is affirm, again, the often over-looked song-writing ability of Dolly. In all the country show-biz caricature and cartoon quality that has grown up around Dolly, people often ignore what a great songwriter she is. The author of classics like Jolene, Love Is Like A Butterfly and I Will Always Love You (the original is a breath of fresh air of you’re only familiar with the Whitney Houston version). Don’t Let It Trouble Your Mind is not as well known as any of those, in fact it is relatively obscure, and yet it bears all the hallmarks of a classic, whether in the original by Dolly, or in the excellent cover by Rhiannon.

So here’ the songsheet. As a country song, there’s nothing too complicated here, although the timing is sometimes a little unexpected. The song sheet includes the song in two keys – the first (C) a little easier to play and (for me) to sing, the second (Bb) consistent with the originals by both Dolly Parton and Rhiannon Giddens.

Enjoy!

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