Uke Tunes

Uke-ifying my favourite songs


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O Children – Nick Cave and the Bad Seeds

Another Nick Cave song, and another where appearances can be deceptive – a gentle but intense song that ultimately appears to be a ballad of murder and suicide.

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Yet this is the song that, despite having a moderate sized hit with Where The Wild Roses Grow, has probably had the biggest exposure of any Nick Cave song, albeit maybe unknowingly for the majority of it’s audience. O Children was first released in 2004 on Cave’s double album Abattoir Blues / The Lyre of Orpheus, an album that was in effect two albums, almost flip-sides of each other – Abattoir Blues a more menacing, driving rock album, and The Lyre of Orpheus a quieter, more reflective album – elsewhere the distinction being stated much better as Abattoir Blues being “a rock & roll record… a pathos-drenched, volume-cranked rocker, full of crunch, punishment – and taste” and The Lyre of Orpheus “a much quieter, more elegant affair… more consciously restrained, its attention to craft and theatrical flair more prevalent.” O Children closes out The Lyre of Orpheus.

But it was the choice of the song to feature in a pivotal scene in the 2010 film Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows (Part 1) that both brought a certain emotional intensity to the movie, and also brought Cave’s music to a far broader audience than he had ever been exposed to before. As this interesting article points out, the inclusion of music “from an artist whose work has been steeped in lechery, sin and redemption, characteristics [is] not necessarily associated with a holiday-season family blockbuster”. And yet it worked, and that scene, and this song, are held in great affection by many fans of Harry Potter.

And here is the songsheet. It’s a long sprawling song, so had to stretch to two pages – sorry about that. It’s a straightforward chord sequence, the rough timing of which I’ve indicated in the intro – the only trick being to delay the [D] chord at the end of the sequence (it’s only two beats). The song itself has Cave singing with a group of backing singers, and so in places the lines overlap – I’ve tried to indicate where these overlaps happen with asterisked chords – don’t play both of these chords, they are in effect the same chord, just shown twice for clarity. Enjoy!

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Caravan Girl – Goldfrapp

I was a bit late to Goldfrapp, if truth be known. It wasn’t until the more acoustic sounds of their fourth album, Seventh Tree, caught my ears that I started to pay attention.

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From the cinematic soundscapes of the debut Felt Mountain, to the glam-meets-dance of Black Cherry and Supernature, the folk-meets-electronica sounds of Seventh Tree, the 80s-revisited vibe of Head First, and the lush orchestral mood of Tales Of Us, Goldfrapp have always taken a highly-stylised and deliberate approach to the twists and turns of their musical career. Seventh Tree took inspiration from paganism and surreal childrens books, and marked a more earthier sound that was a deliberate contrast to the glamour and synthetic feel of their previous releases. Despite the folk stylings this was still a pop record, with songs like A&E and Caravan Girl having a commercial appeal that saw them become hits. Caravan Girl is a great song, a lovely, bouncing late-summer song that can’t help bringing a smile to the face.

And so to the songsheet. Nothing too tricksy here. It definitely needs a good, driving rhythm to keep it moving. Chord wise, all relatively straightforward, with the possible exception of the F/C – I don’t think that’s the right name for it, but basically it’s an F with a C on the top string. An F (or C) by itself will do if you feel so inclined. Finally, I think this would definitely benefit from lots of oooh-ing, la-ing and lovely harmonies. Enjoy!


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Life Is A Rollercoaster – Ronan Keating

I love this song! I don’t care what anybody says, or where that puts me in your credibility league table. But this song is a cracker!

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Now don’t get my wrong – I really can’t abide Boyzone, or indeed any boyband stuff. And I’m not very partial to any other Ronan Keating songs either (although, to be fair, I don’t think I’ve really sought any of it out). However, this song stood out to me when I first heard it, and hasn’t lost its charm as far as I’m concerned.

I suspect that might have something to do with the song originating not from Mr Keating, but from the can-do-no-wrong-in-my-book pen of Mr Gregg Alexander. Who he, you say? Well he is none other that the frontman, songwriter and main driving force behind the late-90s one-hit wonders New Radicals. Breaking up after a single album (but my, what an album), Rollercoaster was actually scheduled for their second album, but was never recorded by the Radicals.

(Note, another Gregg Alexander song appears elsewhere on here, in the form of Lost Stars from the movie Begin Again. And that is just as wonderful!)

So the song sheet is pretty straight forward. A standard song structure, pretty reasonable chords (you can go with a Dm instread of the Dm7 if that is a problem for you), and just a feel-good, sing-along. Enjoy!


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Night Café – OMD

1980s synthpop has been a rich vein on this site, and I make no apologies for that. Many of those songs seem to translate well to the ukulele.

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What has surprised me recently, though, is how many of the bands of that era are still around, and still creating new music. Not just mining the nostalgia-circuit (although there’s nothing wrong with that per se) but actively creating new and interesting music. Not least of those is Orchestral Manoeuvres in the Dark, forever shortened to OMD.

Born from the same late-1970s scene that also resulted in the likes of Echo and the Bunnymen and The Teardrop Explodes, OMD were always an interesting proposition, forever balancing their pop sensibilities with experimental, avant-garde elements. Notorious for following up their most successful and critically acclaimed album (Architecture and Morality – not exactly choc-full of hummable tunes itself) with the experimental cold-war themed Dazzle Ships (musique concrete, sound collages and short-wave radio exceprts), and reducing their sales by 90% into the bargain. OMD have ploughed their own path over the years. And in recent times that has resulted in something of a renaissance – their last album, English Electric, managing the trick of being a career highlight (after nearly 40 years), clearly an OMD record, yet also remarkably contemporary. They have a new album out later this year (The Punishment of Luxury) and if the early tracks are anything to go by that promises to be just as good.

Night Café was a single taken from English Electric, and is a gorgeous medium tempo, chorus-less (a synth riff takes that role) song that is far darker than it at first seems. Check out the video (below) to see how dark!

So here’s the songsheet. There’s only three chords, and they’re G, C and D, so it couldn’t be easier! I’ve also included tab for the synth riff that opens the song and runs between the verses, which again is nothing too tricky. Enjoy!


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Beautiful Day – U2

beautiful-dayU2 seem to be something of a marmite band, to say the least. As I’ve said before, I can understand that. But one or two songs seem to rise above that and have become bona fide classics. Beautiful Day is, I would say, in that category.

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Beautiful Day was the first track from the band’s 2000 album All That You Can’t Leave Behind. In many ways the song was a throw-back to the sound of their early days, coming as it did after the band’s adventures during the 1990s which saw them embracing a more contemporary, radical sound influenced in part by the electronic and dance-culture of the day. It was a move that the band were wary of and debated for a long time before finally convincing themselves it was a good thing. In reality, whilst clearly echoing that early sound, the song wouldn’t have been what it was without the band having been through those 1990s – the electronics, textures, drumbeat, whilst more subtle, are clearly an extension of that experimentation.

Lyrically the song is a little ambiguous, a not uncommon trait amongst the bands songs, living at that intersection of spirituality, romance and self-help, and has been described by Bono as being about “a man who has lost everything, but finds joy in what he still has”.  Whatever the specifics of the lyrics, though, this is clearly a song designed (some might say cynically so) to uplift, and for me it does that in spades.

Over the years Beautiful Day has established itself as a classic, reaching number 1 in many countries, garnering three Grammy awards in 2001 (including both song and record of the year), and becoming something of a mainstay for TV sport highlights. The song has been played at every U2 concert since.

So here’s the song sheet. In many ways its quite straightforward. But the sheet may be a little misleading in that respect. They key is getting the rhythm of the main riff right. The timing indicated in the sheet is a rough approximation, and the best thing today is to listen to the original and get the feel from that. However, to help with that I’ve recorded an excerpt of the song that you can listen to below – essentially this covers the main riff (x4) and the F#m “Touch me…” bridge section.  Hope it helps. Timing is something like:

[A] 1 2 [Bm7] 3 [D] 4 5 [G] 1 2 3 [D] 1 2 3 [A] 1 2 3 4 5;  and

[F#m] 1 2 3 [G] 1 2 3 4 5 [D] 1 2 3 [A] 1 2 3 4 5

Note that if you struggle with all of the main riff, you can get away without the [Bm7][D] chords.

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Make You Feel My Love – Bob Dylan / Adele

bob_dylan_-_time_out_of_mindadele_-_make_you_feel_my_loveI remember the first few times of listening to Bob Dylan’s 1997 album Time Out Of Mind and being particularly struck by this song. I guess that, as a stark, piano led ballad it had a clear, distinctive sound amongst the swampy, Daniel-Lanois-produced songs.

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And yet I didn’t realise at the time how massive the song would become. Originally surfacing as a Billy Joel recording, and then the following year by Garth Brooks, the song has become something of a modern classic, covered by a myriad of artists from many genres. But I don’t think it was until Adele covered the song on here debut album 19 in 2008 that it really seemed to take off. In doing so she really made the song her own, with a simple, piano-led stripped back performance that gets to the emotional heart of the song. Personally I love them both – the Dylan original, with its slightly cracked vocal, has a world-weary feel, whilst the Adele version with just the vocal and piano works equally well. Both proving what a great song this is.

The song sheet is transposed from the originals, not just to make it easier to play but mainly so I could sing it! There’s nothing tricky chord wise here, just some lovely sounding changes. Clearly this isn’t designed for the ubiquitous ukulele strumming pattern, and so requires a bit more sensitivity. But this one is definitely a case of less is more. [Note : See the video in the comments for a suggestion for a simple accompanying picking pattern for this]

Enjoy!

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One Little Song – Gillian Welch

souljourneyLooking back it’s been over 18 months since I posted a Gillian Welch song on here. So it seemed time to rectify that.

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So this morning this little ditty popped up whilst the iPod was playing on shuffle. And I thought, “that’s nice” and “that would work on the ukulele”. So this evening I gave it a try. And I was right – it does work.

This is the third song from 2003’s Soul Journey album that I’ve posted on here (see also Look At Miss Ohio and No One Knows My Name). Which is odd, because as I said previously that album is probably my least favourite of her albums (which doesn’t mean it’s bad, it just means that Gillian sets the bar *so* high). But in contrast to the fuller band sound of a number of the tracks, One Little Song is stripped back to the very basics – just haunting vocals and picked guitar. It is a brief but not inconsequential tune that is seemingly born of a struggle to write a new tune (Welch sets herself high standards, and has commented that songwriting can be a struggle, something that contributed to the 8 year gap between Soul Journey and it’s follow-up, The Harrow and the Harvest).

And here’s the songsheet. Nothing too complicated as far as the chords are concerned, although there are a number of barre chords in there. I’ve added in an Asus4 for the intro, and you can throw a few of those into the first couple of lines of the verses if you wish, to give it a bit more colour. Oh, and this is definitely one to try picking if you can – its not really a strummer. Enjoy!

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