Uke Tunes

Uke-ifying my favourite songs

Nobody’s Hero – Stiff Little Fingers

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Sometimes you just went a gentle strum, a lullaby that lulls you into believing that everything is alright. And other times you just want some full-on punk rock aggression that lets you shout and holler. Yes, even on a ukulele. This one definitely falls in the latter category.

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Stiff Little Fingers are from Belfast, and whilst initially a fairly standard rock covers band, their discovery of punk, plus prompting from journalist Gordon Ogilvie, prompted a change of direction that saw them fully embracing the energy and spirit of punk, married to a lyrical outlook that was very centred on their own experiences of Northern Ireland at the time – one where The (somewhat euphemistically titled) Troubles were at it’s height. A series of classic punk singles followed, spearheaded by their first two releases (Suspect Device and Alternative Ulster) and a classic debut album in the form of Inflammable Material.

SLF were always a band who were not afraid – in fact, actively sought – to embrace the political in both their songs and their actions (the inspiration for this post came from their inclusion in Daniel Rachel’s excellent oral history of the music and politics of Rock Against Racism, 2 Tone and Red Wedge, “Walls Come Tumbling Down” – n.b. I have a feeling there might be a few other posts inspired by said book!). But as the band matured that political viewpoint was often balanced with more personal songs as well, although very often even those would be short through with a political perspective.

Nobody’s Hero is one such song. Essentially a song sung back to the fans by lead singer Jake Burns, urging them not to put him on a pedestal, and pushing back on the expectations that such obsessive fans had of him,  encouraging those fans to “get up, get out, be what you are” – to do their own thing and make something of themselves. In that way it was truly in the spirit of punk, and what emerged after it – that whole anybody can do it, do it yourself mindset. Jake barks the lyrics with a passion that the band were renowned from, and whilst slightly slower than those early songs, the spirit, energy and aggression of punk is still there.

And so to the song sheet. As with most SLF songs, there’s quite a lot of words. But fortunately the chords are relatively straightforward (just the odd F# thrown in). The only challenge might be the speed, and particularly the speed of the chord changes during the chorus. But with a little practice (start slowly, and then speed up) all should be fine. Enjoy!

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