Uke Tunes

Uke-ifying my favourite songs

The Miracle (Of Joey Ramone) – U2

5 Comments

themiracle<songsheet>

I’ve waxed lyrical about U2 in the past, and for years, despite their hugeness as a band (or maybe because of it) that’s felt a desperately uncool position to take. Not that being cool is something that I’m overly concerned about, but they’ve certainly attracted their fair share of detractors. I can understand that to an extent – reaching as big an audience as possible has always been in the DNA of the band, and the idea of being a culy favourite is almost anathema to them. So the things they’ve done and the stunts they’ve pulled to maintain that position have sometime rankled. And that’s before you get to Bono’s “do-gooding” and the tax situation. Those are easy things to pick fights on, but personally (and as a fan I declare a relative lack of objectivity here) I think the almost instinctive U2-hating knee-jerk reaction has become a lazy conformance to stereotype.

The recent launch of their new album “Songs of Innocence” into 500 million iTunes accounts, unbidden, was greeted with the to-be-expected cries for these vociferous haters. But it’s been interesting over the last month or so, after the initial noise died down, to see how many people are discovering (or rediscovering) the band as a result of the stunt. Which to a certain extent justifies the action. Certainly Bono has commented that the band were afraid that this collection of songs (some of their most personal in recent times) wouldn’t be heard, and that they wanted to get them out there and give people a chance to hear them. People certainly had that chance, even if they chose not to take them up on the offer.

The album is one that looks back, as the title suggests, to the early days of the band and its members as they were growing up. In that sense it is a concept album, although not with the overblown pretentions that might be associated with such a label. For what it’s worth, I think it’s their strongest collection of songs for quite a while. “The Miracle (Of Joey Ramone)” harks back to the early days of punk, and crytalises the bands (and particularly Bono’s) reaction to the adrenalin rush of that music, and in particular the sounds of The Ramones  – “the most beautiful sound I’d ever heard”. Whilst some may accuse them of bandwagon jumping, the Ramones were a significant influence on U2 right from the beginning, even if that’s not immediately obvious in the band’s sound in general, and in this song in particular. And the tribute is certainly appreciated by those who knew Joey Ramone.

So here’s the songsheet. I’ve actually based this around the “(Busker Version)” included as part of the Acoustic sessions on the deluxe version of the album. I can’t find a copy of that on YouTube (here’s a Spotify link), but listen to this version from a recent BBC session with Jo Whiley, or this version from an Italian TV performance. The songsheet probably makes more sense when listening to these versions, and being familiar with the song will certainly help in getting a feel for how to play it. A few notes though. The [Asus4] bits at the end of each line in the chorus are a couple of grace notes that – to my mind – add something at that point (and are prevelant on the busker version). The [A5] is a power chord, and the song probably works well with power chords throughout, but some of them are hard to play on the uke(!), so I’ve only kept it in for the unaccompanied riff bit. Also I’m not totally convinced about the chords in the “We can hear you…” bit, but they sound OK. Enjoy!

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5 thoughts on “The Miracle (Of Joey Ramone) – U2

  1. Well,this is great.I,ve played guitar for 40 years and just started to play the ukulele few weeks ago.Loooking for some uke sites I found yours and kudos to you for sharing with other uke players.I really like the way you present your site with musical examples and pdf.Thank you from a danish uke player. Greetings from Robert.

    • Thanks, Robert. I too was a guitar player, although not for as long as you. But I’ve really taken to the uke recently, in no small part because of the communal nature of the instrument. Being able to play with a group of others (and our group can get big sometime – we gigged with 50-60 players this weekend!) is a really great experience.

  2. Nice job but could you help me with strumming? I dont see it anywhere.

    • I’ll have a go at recording what *I* play, someone over the next few days, and post that up. It’s easier for me to do that than try to describe it.

  3. Pingback: Beautiful Day – U2 | Uke Tunes

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